What does the GED test look like?

The GED test, also known as the General Educational Development test, is a high school equivalency test that measures the knowledge and skills of individuals who did not graduate from high school. It is a widely recognized and accepted alternative to a traditional high school diploma, and can open up many opportunities for those who pass it. If you’re considering taking the GED test, it’s important to understand what it looks like, so you can prepare yourself for the exam. In this article, we will provide an overview of the GED test, including its structure, content, scoring, and passing requirements. We will also discuss how to prepare for the GED test, so you can feel confident and ready when it comes time to take the exam.

GED Test Structure and Format

The GED test is comprised of four subject areas: Reasoning Through Language Arts, Mathematical Reasoning, Science, and Social Studies. Each subject area is tested in a separate exam, and all four exams must be passed in order to earn a GED diploma.

The Reasoning Through Language Arts test measures the ability to read, write, and understand text. It includes questions on grammar, sentence structure, and text analysis. The test is divided into two parts: a reading comprehension section and a writing section. The reading comprehension section includes multiple-choice questions based on a reading passage, while the writing section requires the test-taker to write an essay.

The Mathematical Reasoning test measures the ability to reason mathematically, solve problems, and understand mathematical concepts. It includes questions on algebra, geometry, and data analysis. The test is divided into two parts: a calculator section and a non-calculator section.

The Science test measures the ability to understand and analyze scientific concepts and information. It includes questions on biology, chemistry, physics, and earth and space science. The test is divided into multiple-choice and short answer questions.

The Social Studies test measures the ability to understand and analyze social studies concepts and information. It includes questions on history, geography, economics, and government. The test is divided into multiple-choice and short answer questions.

Each of the four GED tests are computer-based, and are delivered in a multiple-choice format with the exception of the Reasoning Through Language Arts Writing section. The test is timed and test-takers will have a specific amount of time to complete each test. The total testing time for all four tests is approximately 7 hours and 5 minutes. It is important to note that some states may have slight variations in their testing format, but the overall structure and format remains the same.

GED Test Scoring and Passing Requirements

The GED test is scored on a scale of 100-200, with a passing score of 145 for each subject area. This means that test-takers must score at least 145 on each of the four subject area tests in order to pass the GED and earn a high school equivalency diploma.

Scores are typically released within a few weeks of taking the test, and test-takers will receive a report indicating their scores for each subject area. If a test-taker does not pass a subject area, they can retake the test up to two times within a calendar year.

It’s important to note that each state sets its own passing score for the GED test and some states may have different passing requirements. So, it’s important for test-takers to be aware of the passing requirements in their state before taking the GED test.

Some states may also have additional requirements, such as age limits, residency requirements, and citizenship requirements, so it’s important for test-takers to research and understand these requirements before registering for the GED test.

In summary, the GED test is scored on a scale of 100-200 and test-takers must score at least 145 on each subject area to pass the test. Test-takers are allowed to retake the test up to two times within a calendar year, but it’s important to check the passing requirements in their state before taking the test.

 

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