What is the difference between Hiset and GED?

HiSET and GED are two popular options for individuals looking to earn their high school equivalency credentials. Both HiSET and GED are recognized by the majority of colleges and employers in the United States as equivalent to a high school diploma. However, there are some key differences between the two programs that individuals should be aware of before deciding which one to pursue. In this article, we will explore the history, format, eligibility, scoring, and recognition of both HiSET and GED, in order to help you make an informed decision about which program is right for you.

History of Hiset and GED

The GED, or General Educational Development, has been around since 1942. It was created as a way for returning veterans of World War II to earn their high school equivalency credentials and re-enter the workforce. Since then, the GED has become the most widely recognized and accepted high school equivalency test in the United States.

The HiSET, or High School Equivalency Test, was created by Educational Testing Service (ETS) in 2013 as an alternative to the GED. ETS developed the HiSET in response to concerns about the cost and format of the GED, as well as the need for more flexibility in testing options for adult learners.

Since its inception, HiSET has been adopted by several states as their official high school equivalency test, and it has been gaining popularity among test-takers.

Both GED and HiSET are standardized test and they are recognized by most of the colleges, universities and employers as equivalent of a high school diploma. But the test format and content are different.

Format and Content of Hiset and GED

The format and content of the HiSET and GED are different. The GED consists of four subject tests: Reasoning Through Language Arts, Mathematical Reasoning, Science, and Social Studies. Each test is timed, and test-takers have two hours and forty-five minutes to complete each test. The GED is only offered in a computer-based format.

The HiSET, on the other hand, consists of five subject tests: Language Arts – Reading, Language Arts – Writing, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies. Each test is timed, and test-takers have two hours and fifteen minutes to complete each test. The HiSET is offered in both computer-based and paper-based formats.

The content of both HiSET and GED tests are aligned with high school curricula, covering subjects such as mathematics, science, social studies, reading, and writing. The GED tests are more focused on reasoning and critical thinking while HiSET tests are more focused on the application of knowledge.

In addition, The HiSET test includes an additional essay test in the writing section, whereas the GED test does not include this. Also, the HiSET test includes more questions in Science and Social Studies sections than the GED test.

Individuals should be familiar with the format and content of the test they are planning to take and should prepare accordingly.

Eligibility and Test Centers for Hiset and GED

Eligibility requirements for HiSET and GED are similar, with a few key differences. In general, individuals must be at least 16 years old and not currently enrolled in high school in order to take either test. However, there may be additional requirements in some states.

To take the GED test, individuals must also meet certain residency requirements, which vary by state. In most states, individuals must be residents of the state in which they wish to take the test. They may also be required to provide proof of residency, such as a driver’s license or utility bill.

The HiSET test, on the other hand, has less strict residency requirements. Individuals can take the HiSET test in any state, regardless of where they live. However, they may be required to provide proof of age and identity.

Both GED and HiSET tests are offered at official test centers, which are typically located at community colleges, adult education centers, and vocational schools. The availability of test centers may vary by state and region. GED test centers are only available in computer-based format, while the HiSET test centers are available in both computer-based and paper-based formats.

Before registering for the test, it is important to check the availability of test centers and their format, as well as the specific requirements for taking the test in your state or region.

Scoring and Results of Hiset and GED

The scoring and results for the HiSET and GED are different. The GED test is scored on a scale of 100-200, with a passing score of 145 on each subject test. Test-takers must pass all four subject tests in order to earn their GED. The GED test results are usually available within a few hours of completing the test.

The HiSET test is scored on a scale of 1-20, with a passing score of 8 on each subject test. Test-takers must pass all five subject tests in order to earn their HiSET. The HiSET test results are usually available within a few weeks of completing the test.

In both GED and HiSET, if a test-taker does not pass one or more of the subject tests, they can retake the test(s) they did not pass after a certain period. The retake policies and fees may vary by state.

Both GED and HiSET credentials are considered equivalent to a high school diploma. However, some colleges, universities, and employers may have different policies on accepting HiSET or GED. It’s important to check with the specific institution or employer to understand their policies.

Recognition and Acceptance of Hiset and GED

Both HiSET and GED are recognized and accepted as equivalent to a high school diploma by the majority of colleges, universities, and employers in the United States. However, acceptance policies may vary by institution or employer.

The GED has been around for longer and is more widely recognized, with most states and institutions accepting it as a valid high school equivalency credential. However, the HiSET has been gaining recognition in recent years, with several states adopting it as their official high school equivalency test.

It is important to check with the specific institution or employer to understand their policies on accepting HiSET or GED. Some institutions may require additional documentation or testing before accepting a HiSET or GED credential.

In addition, some states may have different policies on accepting HiSET or GED. For example, some states only accept one of the test and do not accept the other. Therefore, it is important to be familiar with the policies in your state.

In general, both HiSET and GED are widely recognized and accepted, but it is essential to verify with the specific institution or employer to ensure acceptance of the chosen credential.

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