What does the GED test consist of?

The GED (General Educational Development) test is a battery of four subject area tests that measure the skills and knowledge that are generally acquired by students during four years of high school. The GED test is designed for individuals who have not graduated from high school and want to earn a high school equivalency diploma. Passing the GED test is equivalent to having a high school diploma and can open up opportunities for further education and career advancement.

In this article, we will discuss the four subject areas of the GED test, the format and structure of the test, the scoring and passing requirements, accommodations and special considerations, and where to find additional information and resources.

The Four Subject Areas of the GED Test

The GED test is divided into four subject areas:

  • Reasoning Through Language Arts (RLA): This test measures the individual’s ability to read, write, and understand complex texts. It includes questions on grammar, usage, and vocabulary, as well as a written essay.
  • Mathematical Reasoning: This test measures the individual’s ability to understand and apply mathematical concepts and reasoning. It includes questions on number operations and concepts, algebra, geometry, and data analysis.
  • Science: This test measures the individual’s ability to understand and apply scientific concepts and reasoning. It includes questions on life science, physical science, and earth and space science.
  • Social Studies: This test measures the individual’s ability to understand and apply social studies concepts and reasoning. It includes questions on history, geography, economics, and government.

All of the four subject areas are multiple-choice tests, except for the written essay in the RLA test. The duration of the test may vary depending on the state or country you live in, but it is usually around 7.5 hours.

Format and Structure of the GED Test

The GED test is typically administered on a computer, although paper-based testing may still be available in some locations. The test is divided into two parts:

  • Part 1: This part includes multiple-choice questions and is timed. The time allotted for each subject area may vary depending on the state or country you live in.
  • Part 2: This part includes an extended response, or an essay, in the Reasoning Through Language Arts (RLA) test. This part is not timed, and individuals are given a set amount of time to complete the essay.

The GED test is designed to be completed in one day, although some test-takers may be given the option to take one or more subject areas on a different day.

The GED test is designed to be challenging and requires a high level of reading comprehension, mathematical reasoning, and problem-solving skills. However, test-takers are provided with a calculator for the mathematical reasoning test and the science and social studies test provide a resource booklet.

Scoring and Passing the GED Test

The GED test is scored on a scale of 100-200, with a passing score of at least 145 for each subject area. The score for the written essay in the RLA test is combined with the multiple-choice score to determine the overall score for the RLA subject area.

To pass the GED test and earn a high school equivalency diploma, an individual must pass all four subject areas. If an individual does not pass one or more subject areas, they may retake the test as many times as necessary, but must wait a certain period of time between attempts.

The GED test is designed to measure the skills and knowledge that are generally acquired by students during four years of high school. However, passing the GED test does not guarantee college readiness, and individuals may need to take additional courses or assessments to be considered for college admission.

Accommodations and Special Considerations for the GED Test

The GED test is designed to be accessible to all individuals, regardless of their abilities or disabilities. Test-takers with disabilities may request accommodations such as extended testing time, a separate testing room, or assistive technology.

To request accommodations, test-takers should contact the GED testing center or the state department of education in their area and provide documentation of their disability. Test-takers should make the request as early as possible to ensure that the accommodations can be put in place before the test date.

Additionally, there are some other special considerations for the GED test such as language or cultural accommodations. For example, the test is available in Spanish in some areas, and there are also resources available for test-takers who are not proficient in English.

Table of Contents