Is a ged as good as a diploma?

If you’re considering earning your GED, or General Educational Development, you might be wondering if a GED is as good as a high school diploma. The GED is a high school equivalency test that measures a person’s knowledge and skills in five subject areas: mathematics, science, social studies, language arts (reading and writing), and language arts (writing only). It’s designed to be the equivalent of a high school education.

So, is a GED as good as a high school diploma? The short answer is: yes, in most cases, a GED is considered to be the equivalent of a high school diploma.

According to the GED Testing Service, a GED is accepted by nearly all colleges and employers as the equivalent of a high school diploma. In fact, many colleges and universities in the United States will accept a GED in place of a high school diploma for admission.

However, it’s important to note that there may be some exceptions. Some colleges and universities may have specific requirements for admission that may not be met with a GED. In addition, some employers may have their own specific requirements for education that may not be met with a GED.

In summary, a GED is generally considered to be the equivalent of a high school diploma. However, there may be some exceptions, and it’s important to check with the specific college or employer to determine their specific requirements for education.

When did GED become a thing?

The test was revised in 1988 to include an essay section and remained essentially unchanged until January 2002, when a number of revisions came into effect. GED is usually offered in collaboration with a state Department of Education, but the GED Testing Service itself is a joint venture between a private computer-based testing company, Pearson, and a university association, the American Council on Education (ACE). By 1959, more civilians than veterans received the GED test, and in 1963, the VTS changed its name to the General Educational Development Testing Service to reflect this change in the test population.

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