How is the GED scored?

The GED, or General Educational Development, is a high school equivalency test that measures knowledge and skills in four subject areas: math, science, social studies, and language arts. The GED test is used to determine if an individual has the equivalent knowledge and skills of a high school graduate.

The GED scoring system is designed to evaluate an individual’s knowledge and skills in these four subject areas. Each subject test is scored on a scale of 100-200 points. To pass the GED test, an individual must achieve a score of 145 or higher on each subject test. The overall passing score for the GED test is 580 or higher, which is the sum of the scores from all four subject tests.

It’s important to note that the GED test is now computer-based, so the scores are provided immediately after the test, and the GED Testing Service will mail the official score report to the test taker within 3 weeks of taking the test.

How GED Test Scores are Calculated

The GED test scores are calculated based on the number of questions answered correctly on each subject test. Each subject test is divided into two parts, and each part is worth half of the total score for that subject test. For example, if an individual receives a score of 150 on a subject test, it means they answered 75 questions correctly on each part of the test.

The GED test uses a standardized scoring method called “equating.” Equating is a statistical process that ensures that the scores earned on different versions of the GED test are equivalent in terms of difficulty and content. This means that the scores earned on one version of the test are comparable to the scores earned on another version of the test.

The GED test also uses a process called “scaling” which is used to adjust the scores to account for differences in difficulty among the test versions. This process ensures that the scores are comparable across different test forms and that the passing score remains consistent from test to test.

GED Passing Scores and Requirements

To pass the GED test, an individual must achieve a score of 145 or higher on each of the four subject tests: math, science, social studies, and language arts. The overall passing score for the GED test is 580 or higher, which is the sum of the scores from all four subject tests.

It’s important to note that the GED test is now computer-based, and the passing score is determined by the GED Testing Service, which sets the passing score after analyzing the test-takers’ performance data. This ensures that the passing score is aligned with the level of knowledge and skills of graduating high school seniors.

In addition to achieving a passing score, individuals must also meet certain age and residency requirements to take the GED test. The minimum age requirement varies by state, but most states require individuals to be at least 18 years old to take the GED test. Some states also have residency requirements, which means that the individual must be a resident of that state to take the GED test.

GED Score Reports and Interpretation

After taking the GED test, individuals will receive a score report that shows their scores for each subject test and an overall score. The score report also includes information on how to interpret the scores and what they mean in terms of an individual’s knowledge and skills.

On the score report, individuals will see their scores for each subject test, as well as their overall score. They will also see the passing score for each subject test, as well as the overall passing score for the GED test. This allows individuals to compare their scores to the passing scores and determine if they have passed the test.

The score report also includes information on how to interpret the scores. For example, it may show what level of knowledge and skills is associated with different score ranges. This can help individuals understand their strengths and weaknesses, and identify areas where they may need to improve.

Additionally, the score report includes information on how to access additional resources, such as study materials and retesting options, if the individual did not pass the test.

GED Re-testing and Score Improvement

If an individual does not pass the GED test, they may retake the test after a waiting period, which varies by state. The waiting period is typically around 60 days, but can be longer in some states.

Before retaking the test, individuals may want to consider using additional resources such as study materials, practice tests, and tutoring to improve their scores. There are many official GED test preparation resources available online and in print, including practice tests, study guides, and online classes. These resources can help individuals identify their strengths and weaknesses and focus their study efforts on the areas where they need the most improvement.

When retaking the GED test, individuals have the option to retake the entire test or just the subject test(s) where they did not pass. Some states also have a limit on the number of times a person can retake the test.

It’s important to note that some states have different rules and policies regarding retaking the GED test, so it’s recommended to check with your local GED testing center or the GED Testing Service for specific information.

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